Five projects announced as part of APAM 2020

The line-up for the first edition of the revamped Australian Performing Arts Market (APAM) is out, and we are excited to announce we’ll be representing five new Australian works in the program this coming February.

We are thrilled that our latest project, Pony Express’ speculative deep time symposium Epoch Wars, will pitch as part of the program in Melbourne.

Following their recent creative development and artistic exchange in China, we will work with Pony Express (Loren Kronemyer and Ian Sinclair) to secure additional presentation partners for this radically inclusive new performance work.

Pony Express will be joined by work in development Hide the Dog, a collaboration between Nathan Maynard and Jamie McCaskill. This big new First Nations work for families produced by our colleagues at Tasmania Performs explores the striking similarities in storytelling traditions between Nathan’s Tasmanian Aboriginal and Jamie’s Maori cultures.

It encourages children to feel a connection to culture, no matter where they may live.

Hot off the heels of its world premiere this week is Steamworks Arts歸屬 Gui Shu (Belong), an immersive Taiwanese-Australian dance work that brings together acclaimed sound, vision and movement artists from both nations.

Joining those works are a company very familiar with the APAM stage, The Farm, with their latest Throttle. This high-octane b-grade thriller takes audiences out of the theatre and puts them behind the wheel for a live-action drive-in movie experienced through their windscreens and car radios.

And with an Australian premiere season already announced as part of Asia TOPA, Kamila Andini’s The Seen and Unseen will also have full length presentations as part of the APAM program.

We cannot wait to introduce these exciting new Australian works to presenters from around Australia and the world.

In everything we do, we acknowledge that we live on Aboriginal land and constantly learn from the wisdom of our First Peoples.

Where we are and the history that precedes us informs how we work and how we move forward.